Sunday January 23, 2005 at 11:45 am

Security test gone awry:

Police slipped some plastic explosives into a random passenger’s suitcase as part of a test of sniffer dogs.  Four days later, the explosives were still missing.

Schneier:

It’s perfectly reasonable to plant an explosive-filled suitcase in an airport in order to test security.  It is not okay to plant it in someone’s bag without his knowledge and permission.  (The explosive residue could remain on the suitcase long after the test, and might be picked up by one of those trace mass spectrometers that detects the chemical residue associated with bombs.)  But if you are going to plant plastic explosives in the suitcase of some innocent passenger, shouldn’t you at least write down which suitcase it was?

Saturday January 22, 2005 at 09:11 pm

What you’ll wish you’d known:

I’m not saying you shouldn’t hang out with your friends– that you should all become humorless little robots who do nothing but work. Hanging out with friends is like chocolate cake. You enjoy it more if you eat it occasionally than if you eat nothing but chocolate cake for every meal. No matter how much you like chocolate cake, you’ll be pretty queasy after the third meal of it. And that’s what the malaise one feels in high school is: mental queasiness.

Tuesday January 18, 2005 at 01:17 am

HP printers jump the shark:

H-P has quietly begun implementing “region coding” for its highly lucrative print cartridges for some of its newest printers sold in Europe. Try putting a printer cartridge bought in the U.S. into a new H-P printer configured to use cartridges purchased in Europe and it won’t work. Software in the printer determines the origin of the ink cartridge and whether it will accept it.

The company introduced region-coding on several printers in the summer so it won’t have to keep altering prices to keep pace with currency movements, says Kim Holm, vice president for H-P’s supplies business in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. H-P eventually plans to introduce the concept across its entire line of inkjet printers, he adds.